National Cued Speech Association

Certification Requirements

An Instructor of Cued Speech certificate is aInsCert Certification for Interpreters and Transliterators credential that certifies the holder’s ability to present information about CS and to teach beginning level CS courses. In the future, professional development modules will be made available that will expand the scope of certification to include topics such as cuereading; instructing families; instructing transliterators; instructing professionals in speech, audiology, deaf education, special education, etc.

In order to be certified as an Instructor of Cued Speech, an individual must be at least 18 years of age and meet the following five requirements:

The requirements can be completed in any order, but all five must be met within a time period of no more than 3 years for certification to take effect. Certification is permanent, as long as the first three requirements are maintained. However, certification can be revoked from any certified Instructor whose maintenance requirements lapse for more than a year.

NCSA Membership

NCSA membership is an ongoing requirement of Instructor Certification.
Join NCSA now to receive the current issue in the mail and the other benefits of membership. Complete an online form at Cued Speech Discovery to join. »

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Proficiency

Cost: typically around $100 ($85 for NCSA members)
Duration: 3 years

An ongoing requirement of Instructor Certification is evidence of expressive Cued Speech proficiency. This requirement calls for a qualifying score on Expressive Cued Speech Skills: Word-level Assessment (or other NCSA approved assessment) and must be renewed every three years. This test is administered through the mail.
  • The Expressive Cued Speech Skills: Word-level Assessment is offered through the NCSA Testing Coordinator. To qualify for certification, a rating of Superior Accuracy (97-100% and ALL liaisons) with Satisfactory Form (2.5 – 3.4) is required.

Continuing Education

Certified instructors are required to demonstrate they have participated in 15 hours of activity over a three year period (12 hours related to cueing and 3 hours related to deafness or communication disorders).
  • Examples of acceptable "cueing related activities" include, but are not limited to, the following: teaching/assisting a Cued Speech workshop, presenting about Cued Speech at a conference, participating on the board of the National Cued Speech Association or one of its affiliates, taking a Cued Speech workshop, organizing or attending a Cues on Tap, blogging about Cued Speech, participating in email / facebook discussions, creating materials to support cuers, developing a new module for InsCert, staffing a cueing association’s booth at a conference, writing an article for OnCue or another newsletter, etc.
  • Examples of acceptable "non-cueing related activities" include, but are not limited to, the following: taking an ASL and/or Deaf culture class, attending an ASHA conference, attending a local or national interpreting convention, attending a lecture about cochlear implants or other deafness related topic, etc.
  • Keep track of your hours on a simple form and by the end of a three year period submit the form to the InsCert committee upon request. Click here to download the CAUsE Excel sheet to record your activities »
  • Get a complete description of CAUsE. Click here to view / download the document (PDF) »

Basic Instructor Workshop

Cost: typically around $150 (varies according to sponsoring agency)
Duration: 3 years

Registration forms for specific BIWS dates for upcoming events are posted roughly 3 months ahead of time. Earlybird and regular registrations should be submitted via mail, postmarked according to the guidelines on the registration form. The registration fee is non-refundable, unless more than 30 days notice of cancellation is given. In most cases, registration at the door is also possible, subject to the availability of space and is granted at the discretion of workshop instructors on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The BIWS, or Basic Instructor Workshop, is a 2-day intensive workshop taught by 2 qualified instructor trainers. The BIWS was designed to ensure that all instructors are exposed to the NCSA’s current policy on cueing and cueing mechanics standards. However, the workshop alone is not meant to be complete preparation for the national certification exam. Additional reading is recommended in The ICS-National Certification Exam section below.

As more published standards become available, additional training options can be offered by agencies and individuals outside the committee. Until that time, successful completion of the BIWS is required for certification.

The ICS-National Certification Exam

Cost:
Earlybird deadline: $125
Regular deadline: $150
At-the-Door (limited availability): $200

Registration forms for specific BIWS dates for upcoming events are posted roughly 3 months ahead of time. Earlybird and regular registrations should be submitted via mail, postmarked according to the guidelines on the registration form. The registration fee is non-refundable, unless more than 30 days notice of cancellation is given. In most cases, registration at the door is also possible, subject to the availability of space and is granted at the discretion of exam proctors on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The ICS-National Certification Exam battery includes a written test and an Assessing Cue Errors (ACE) test. The written test consists of 100 multiple choice questions, 50 questions drawn from Cued Speech production topics, and 50 questions drawn from the additional topics listed below. The ACE test consists of 30 multiple-choice format test items presented on videotape. Each item may be cued correctly or contain one cueing error and must be categorized accordingly (correct, form error, handshape error, placement error, or number error). In order to pass, a score greater than 85% must be achieved on both the written exam and the ACE (video errors component) in the same sitting (ie. if you are not satisfied with your result, the test must be re-taken in its entirety). Results of the exam are typically mailed to examinees within 4-6 weeks after the exam.

Topics covered by the exam include the following Cued Speech Production & Reception Topics and Additional Topics:
  • Cued Speech Production & Reception Topics
  • Additional Topics
    • CS History: Information about the history of the NCSA can be found on the Web at: www.cuedspeech.org/cued-speech-history The Cued Speech Resource Book contains a good history of the development of the system, as does the R. Orin Cornett Resource Library. »
    • CS Applications (see Info Papers, Special Populations) and Transliteration. Besides being an effective mode of communication for deaf children, Cued Speech has been applied to support a variety of needs in different populations of children. You can read several articles about applications online. Information about transliteration can be found at www.TECUnit.org and in several text books about interpreting Linguistics, Speech, and Speechreading ».
    • Linguistics, Speech, and Speechreading : A basic understanding of linguistic terms and familiarity with speech and speechreading are required for becoming an instructor. Terms and concepts include, but are not limited to: phoneme, morpheme, allomorph, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, viseme, phone, phonics, voiced / voiceless consonants, etc.
      • Being familiar with terminology used by speech-language pathologists helps when having them in class and discussing the benefits of cueing.
      • The NCSA is striving for consistency in terminology used to discuss Cued Speech.
    • CS Research: Some research studies are highlighted during the Basic Instructor Workshop and below; however, general knowledge of research relating to cueing is highly recommended. A detailed bibliography can be found online in the Cornett Collection hosted on the computers of Gallaudet. You should be sure to take the time to read the research and synthesize it for yourself. This list is only meant as an initial guide. Key research studies, include, but not limited to: Deaf Education, ASL, and Sign Systems (Manually Coded English systems)
      • LaSasso, C. & Metzger, M. (1998, Fall) “An Alternate Route for Preparing Deaf Children for BiBi Programs: the Home Language as L1 and Cued Speech for Conveying Traditionally Spoken Languages.” Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, Vol. 3, #4, pp. 265-289.
      • Leybaert, J. and Charlier, B. (1996) “Visual Speech in the Head: The Effect of Cued Speech on Rhyming, Remembering, and Spelling.” Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, Vol. 1, #4, pp. 234-248.
      • LaSasso, C.J., Crain, K., and Leybaert, J. (2003) “Rhyme generation in deaf students: The effect of exposure to Cued Speech.” Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, Vol. 8, #3, pp. 250-270
      • Cued Speech Journal: Special Research Issue (Vol. 4, 1990) Awareness of other CS Journal issues (how many issues have been published, general topics covered, etc.)
      • Nicholls, G.H. and Ling, D. (1982). “Cued Speech and the Reception of Spoken Language.”Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, Vol. 25, #3, pp. 262-269.
      • Awareness of other CS Journal issues (how many issues have been published, general topics covered, etc.)
    • Deaf Education, ASL, and Sign Systems (Manually Coded English systems) Choices in Deafness edited by Sue Schwartz is an excellent reference
    • Deafness / Audiology – Choices in Deafness edited by Sue Schwartz is an excellent reference
    • Representing the NCSA / Other Deafness Organizations – see the Alphabet Soup paper for a list of organizations and their Web sites.

    The exam tests for detailed knowledge of Cued Speech Production and Reception Topics and a basic knowledge of Additional Topics. Some of the topics will be presented in the Basic Instructor Workshop. However, the workshop alone is not meant to be complete preparation for the exam. The PDFs, books and materials listed below are also recommended in preparing for the certification exam. In addition, familiarity with cue notation and phonemic spelling is necessary for reading any written descriptions of cue sequences and phonemes, respectively, that may appear on the exam.

    • NCSA Information Papers:
      • A Quick Overview of Cued Speech. Read more »
      • Using Cued Speech to Maximize the Benefits of Cochlear Implants. Read more »
      • Cued Speech: Myths and Facts. Read more »
      • Cued Speech: Visual Access to Spoken Language. Read more »
      • Cueing with Babies: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Read more »
      • Cued Speech and Literacy: History, Research, and Background Information. Read more »
      • Cued American English: Why is it important in deaf education? Read more »
      • Tips for Working with Cuers in the Classroom. Read more »
    • Key research studies:
    • Language and Deafness 2nd ed. (1994), Quigley and Paul
      • Chapter 1 - Overview of Language and Deafness
      • Chapter 9 – Conclusion
Here are some sample questions you might find on the exam:
  • What is an appropriate way to cue the word “south”?
  • (a) 3s-5t 2s
    (b) 3c-5t 2s
    (c) 3s-5t 7s
    (d) 3sf 7s
    (correct answer is c)

  • Which of the following words can not be cued: 8t 5s
  • (a) chat
    (b) cat
    (c) yam
    (d) chit
    (correct answer is b)

  • What is the maximum number of between word liaisons that might be cued in this sentence: She kicked it over one acre.
  • (a) none
    (b) 2
    (c) 3
    (d) 4
    (correct answer is c)

  • ______________ champions effective communication, language development and literacy through the use of Cued Speech.
  • (a) National Association of the Deaf
    (b) Hearing Loss Association of America
    (c) Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf
    (d) National Cued Speech Association
    (correct answer is d)
  • Daily Cues - Figure out your cue notation!
  • Cue for You Transliterating Services - CLT Services
  • Help families in need for Cued Speech camps by donating to the Deaf Children's Literacy Project
  • iBooks - Cued Speech
  • Nuby, Inc - High Quality, Chemical Free Baby Products
  • Deaf Childrens Literacy Project champions literacy and phonetics for families of deaf and hard of hearing children
Clickable images to articles, sites.